Subscribe to our free daily newsletters
. Earth Science News .




Subscribe to our free daily newsletters



CLIMATE SCIENCE
Syria to join Paris climate pact, isolating US
By Marlowe HOOD
Bonn (AFP) Nov 7, 2017


US mocks Syria joining climate deal
Washington (AFP) Nov 7, 2017 - The United States mocked Syria's arrival in the Paris Agreement on climate change Tuesday, side-stepping the charge that it has isolated itself by being the world's sole hold-out.

Syria had earlier told UN climate talks in Bonn that it will become the 197th country to join the accord, making President Donald Trump's government the only one planning to pull out.

But State Department spokeswoman Heather Nauert fiercely dismissed suggestions that this means that Trump's "America First" policy has in practice meant "America Alone."

"I find it ironic that the government of Syria, OK, would say that it wants to be involved, and that it cares so much about climate and things like CO2 gas," she told reporters.

"If the government of Syria cared so much about what was put in the air, then it wouldn't be gassing its own people," she said, referring to the Damascus regime's brutal civil war tactics.

Nauert said that the department's under secretary for political affairs, Tom Shannon, would lead a US delegation to the Bonn talks next week but that Trump's decision would stand.

"We intend to withdraw from the Paris Agreement as soon as we're eligible to do so," she said.

Pressed on whether Washington had chosen to isolate itself globally, Nauert continued: "The president has said that he is going to assess the situation.

"If we can get a more favorable deal for American businesses, American workers and taxpayers, then we will look at that. But we continue to go forward with the plan of pulling out."

Signed in the French capital in December 2015, the treaty entered into force on November 4, 2016.

No country can formally submit their intent to withdraw until three years after the date of entry into force.

It will then take one year to fully withdraw, meaning the earliest the United States could quit is the day after the 2020 US presidential election.

Trump 'not invited' to Paris climate summit
Paris (AFP) Nov 7, 2017 - US President Donald Trump is not among the around 100 heads of state and government invited to next month's climate summit in Paris, a French presidential aide said Tuesday.

"For now, President Donald Trump is not invited," he said, while noting that representatives of the US government would attend.

Trump announced his decision to withdraw the United States from the historic 2015 Paris Agreement on limiting carbon emissions in June.

The pact calls for capping global warming at "well under" two degrees Celsius (3.6 degrees Fahrenheit) above pre-industrial levels, and 1.5 C if possible.

Around 800 organisations and public stakeholders will be on hand for the December 12 event to be held on Ile Seguin, an island in the Seine River southwest of Paris.

The meeting will follow the 23rd UN climate conference (COP23) that opened in Bonn, Germany, on Monday.

The Bonn meeting is dealing with mainly technical issues such as ensuring transparency and compliance, the reporting of emissions, and procedures for allocating climate funds.

The aide to French President Emmanuel Macron said the upcoming summit would aim to "build coalitions" involving cities, investment funds and development banks to further the goals of the accord.

"The idea is to show that there is action, that we must accelerate actions and find new sources of financing for very concrete projects," he said, calling the meeting "very complementary" to the COP23.

Syria told the UN climate talks in Bonn on Tuesday that it would join the Paris Agreement, leaving the United States as the only nation in the world opting to stay outside the landmark treaty.

"We are going to join the Paris Agreement," the Syrian delegate, speaking in Arabic, said during a plenary session at the 196-nation talks, according to Safa Al Jayoussi of the IndyAct NGO, who was monitoring the session.

The United States ratified the 2015 pact but US President Donald Trump announced earlier this year that he would pull out, saying the pact did not serve US interests.

"It is our understanding that the government of Syria announced today their intent to join the Paris Agreement," Nick Nuttall, the spokesman for the UN climate body, told AFP.

Nuttall identified the Syrian delegate as Wadah Katmawi, the deputy minister of the ministry of local administration and environment.

Syria must submit their "instruments of ratification" at the UN headquarters in New York before their adherence becomes official, he added.

According to the Syrian parliament website, a bill was passed on October 22 to ratify the Paris accord, "in accordance with the Syrian Constitution which stipulates the protection of the environment".

Other parties at the 12-day negotiations, tasked with elaborating and implementing the agreement, welcomed the news.

"Syria joining the Paris Agreement will be a good thing," South Africa's chief negotiator Maesela Kekana told AFP.

"That's great," said Chai Qimin, a climate negotiator from China's National Center for Climate Change Strategy and International Cooperation.

"They were the last party to the UN Convention to sign the Paris Agreement," he said, referring to 1992 UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), the bedrock treaty for UN climate talks.

"That leaves only the one who announced their withdrawal," he added, in an oblique reference to the United States.

- US mocks Syria -

War-torn Syria would be the 197th country to sign on to the climate pact, which vows to hold global warming to "well below" two degrees Celsius (3.6 degrees Fahrenheit).

The United States mocked Syria's arrival in the climate change agreement Tuesday, side-stepping the charge that it has isolated itself by being the world's sole hold-out.

State Department spokeswoman Heather Nauert fiercely dismissed suggestions that this means that Trump's "America First" policy has in practice meant "America Alone."

"I find it ironic that the government of Syria, OK, would say that it wants to be involved, and that it cares so much about climate and things like CO2 gas," she told reporters.

"If the government of Syria cared so much about what was put in the air, then it wouldn't be gassing its own people," she said, referring to the Damascus regime's brutal civil war tactics.

Nauert said that the department's under secretary for political affairs, Tom Shannon, would lead a US delegation to the Bonn talks next week but that Trump's decision would stand.

"We intend to withdraw from the Paris Agreement as soon as we're eligible to do so," she said.

- 'Splendid isolation' -

Openly isolated on the climate issue at G-7 and G-20 meetings earlier this year, the United States said it intended to withdraw "unless the president can identify terms that are more favourable to American businesses, workers, and taxpayers."

The Trump administration has not said what those terms might be.

"This means Trump is in splendid isolation -- no one wants to be in his company," said Alden Meyer, a veteran climate analyst at the Washington-based Union of Concerned Scientists.

"With Syria on board, now the entire world is resolutely committed to advancing climate action -- all save one country," said Paula Caballero, director for climate change at the World Resources Institute.

"This should make the Trump administration pause and reflect on their ill-advised announcement about withdrawing from the Paris Agreement."

Signed in the French capital in December 2015, the treaty entered into force on November 4, 2016.

According to the terms, no country can formally submit their intent to withdraw until three years after the date of entry into force.

It will then take one year to fully withdraw, meaning the earliest the United States could officially withdraw is the day after the 2020 election.

"When even Syria -- with all its problems -- can see the sense of a global climate agreement, it really shows how ideologically wedded to climate denialism the US Republican Party has become," said Mohamed Adow, International Climate Lead for Christian Aid.

CLIMATE SCIENCE
Could the Neolithic Revolution offer evidence of best ways to adapt to climate change?
Plymouth UK (SPX) Nov 03, 2017
Human behaviour during the last intense period of global warming might offer an insight into how best to adapt to current climate change, a study suggests. Research led by the University of Plymouth shows that between 10,000 and 15,000 years ago, a major shift in climatic conditions led to the planet becoming significantly warmer and wetter. This led to a range of responses from, and ... read more

Related Links
Climate Science News - Modeling, Mitigation Adaptation


Thanks for being here;
We need your help. The SpaceDaily news network continues to grow but revenues have never been harder to maintain.

With the rise of Ad Blockers, and Facebook - our traditional revenue sources via quality network advertising continues to decline. And unlike so many other news sites, we don't have a paywall - with those annoying usernames and passwords.

Our news coverage takes time and effort to publish 365 days a year.

If you find our news sites informative and useful then please consider becoming a regular supporter or for now make a one off contribution.

SpaceDaily Contributor
$5 Billed Once


credit card or paypal
SpaceDaily Monthly Supporter
$5 Billed Monthly


paypal only

Comment using your Disqus, Facebook, Google or Twitter login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

CLIMATE SCIENCE
Air force error allowed Texas shooter to buy guns despite conviction

In reversal, US tech firms back bill on human trafficking

Crime writer Ian Rankin predicts rise of 'kind and gentle' books

UN council weakens response to Myanmar after China objects

CLIMATE SCIENCE
Liquids take a shine to terahertz radiation

Voltage-driven liquid metal fractals

Cancer cells destroyed with dinosaur extinction metal

Jellyfish-inspired electronic skin glows when it gets hurt

CLIMATE SCIENCE
50 years of data from oxygen minimum lab helps predict the oceans' future

Scientists map coastal communities most vulnerable to natural disasters

Ivory Coast inaugurates huge China-funded dam

Tiny Fiji looks for global impact at Bonn climate talks

CLIMATE SCIENCE
Intensifying winds could increase east Antarctica's contribution to sea level rise

IceBridge Launches Two Sets of Antarctic Flights

Wanted: a medical doctor for a cold adventure

Hopes dashed for giant new Antarctic marine sanctuary

CLIMATE SCIENCE
RUDN University researcher found out what happens to organic matter on rice fields

Flour power to boost food security

The advent of 'green' cattle

Marijuana farming is harming the environment, study shows

CLIMATE SCIENCE
Death toll from Vietnam typhoon rises to 61

Puerto Rico population to drop 14% after hurricane

Future volcanic eruptions could cause more climate disruption

Two dead, thousands flee as floods hit Malaysia's Penang

CLIMATE SCIENCE
Morocco architect fights concrete with tradition

US mission in Niger not what US commanders say it was: reportw

Death of soldiers highlights US military presence in Niger

Pentagon looks at stepped-up Africa role to counter IS

CLIMATE SCIENCE
Newly discovered orangutan species is most endangered great ape

Study shows how memories ripple through the brain

The relentless rise of migration in Europe over last 10,000 years

Climbing Australia's giant red rock Uluru banned




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News






The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2017 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. All articles labeled "by Staff Writers" include reports supplied to Space Media Network by industry news wires, PR agencies, corporate press officers and the like. Such articles are individually curated and edited by Space Media Network staff on the basis of the report's information value to our industry and professional readership. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement