Subscribe to our free daily newsletters
. Earth Science News .




Subscribe to our free daily newsletters



WATER WORLD
The seawater temperature distribution in tropics affects the rainfall in East Asia
by Staff Writers
Tsukuba, Japan (SPX) Feb 05, 2016


This is a the seaside near the Shimoda Marine Research Center. Image courtesy University of Tsukuba. For a larger version of this image please go here.

A wide swatch of Asia, from the tropics to the mid-latitudes, which has wet and dry seasons, is significantly affected by "Asian monsoons."

The amount of rainfall in particular has a close relationship to agriculture and damage from flooding. For this reason, understanding the mechanisms of changes in the Asian monsoon and being able to forecast such changes are vital to social and economic activities in the region.

It is said that from the middle to the end of the 20th century, the amount of land-based rainfall from monsoons has declined globally. Looking at regions such as East Asia, major changes have been confirmed by region over a 10-year to multiple-decade period.

The mechanisms of change in regional rainfall are extremely complex, and there remained great uncertainty in making future forecasts.

The research group led by Professor Hiroaki Ueda and Assistant Professor Youichi Kamae of the University of Tsukuba, Faculty of Life and Environmental Science, performed numerical simulations using climate models, and compared the results with observational data.

They found that specific trends in seawater temperatures in distant tropical regions could explain changes in recent years in the Asian monsoon, a wide-area precipitation system extending across Asia from the tropics to the mid-latitudes.

The group used an atmospheric general circulation model that hypothesizes sea surface temperature distribution in experiments to reproduce observed anomalies in order to investigate the effects of specific water temperature distributions in the tropics in recent years. They also conducted idealized numerical experiments by setting seawater temperatures according to sea area.

They succeeded in reproducing the summer rainfall trend in recent years - low rainfall across an east-west region extending about 4,000 km from northern China to the vicinity of Japan and high rainfall over the Pacific Ocean in the western tropics and western Indian Ocean.

Taking into account the results of the numerical experiments, the group found that the low amount of rainfall in East Asia was clearly related to the seawater temperature distribution in the tropical Pacific Ocean (low in the central and eastern regions and high in the western region).

The research clarifies the influence of tropical oceans on mid-latitude climates located great distances away, across a far broader area than was previously known.

Research paper: Combined effects of recent Pacific cooling and Indian Ocean warming on the Asian monsoon


Thanks for being here;
We need your help. The SpaceDaily news network continues to grow but revenues have never been harder to maintain.

With the rise of Ad Blockers, and Facebook - our traditional revenue sources via quality network advertising continues to decline. And unlike so many other news sites, we don't have a paywall - with those annoying usernames and passwords.

Our news coverage takes time and effort to publish 365 days a year.

If you find our news sites informative and useful then please consider becoming a regular supporter or for now make a one off contribution.

SpaceDaily Contributor
$5 Billed Once


credit card or paypal
SpaceDaily Monthly Supporter
$5 Billed Monthly


paypal only

.


Related Links
University of Tsukuba
Water News - Science, Technology and Politics






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

Previous Report
WATER WORLD
Small ponds produce an outsized share of greenhouse gases
New Haven CT (SPX) Feb 03, 2016
Tiny ponds play a disproportionately large role in global greenhouse gas emissions from inland waters, according to a new study by Yale's School of Forestry and Environmental Studies. Although ponds less than a quarter of an acre in size make up only 8.6% of the surface area of the world's lakes and ponds, they account for 15.1% of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and 40.6% of diffusive meth ... read more


WATER WORLD
Homeless Gazans struggle during harsh winter

Canada considers housing Syrian refugees at military bases

Chinese ship to join Australia-led search for MH370

Facebook blocks unlicensed gun sales

WATER WORLD
ChemChina 'eyeing Syngenta' in biggest ever Chinese takeover

Researchers develop completely new kind of polymer

Energy harvesting via smart materials

A new quantum approach to big data

WATER WORLD
In the Southern Ocean, a carbon-dioxide mystery comes clear

Mercury in seafood not harmful to aging brain: study

Ready for the high seas?

Iraq awards Italy's Trevi contract to fix imperilled dam

WATER WORLD
Antarctic study identifies melting ice sheet's role in sea level rise

Greenland model could help estimate sea level rise

Denmark to chair Nordic Defense Cooperation in 2016

New gravity dataset will help unveil the Antarctic continent

WATER WORLD
Scientists discover how plants tailor growth to the seasons

Transgenic plants' 'die and let live' strategy dramatically increases drought resistance

Organic agriculture key to feeding the world sustainably

China firm offers record $43 bn for agri-giant Syngenta

WATER WORLD
Lava flow crisis averted

Climate change boosted 'once-a-century' floods: study

Shallow earthquakes and deeper tremors along southern San Andreas fault

Alaska hit by 6.8-magnitude earthquake: USGS

WATER WORLD
Tanzania arrests three after British wildlife pilot killed

Ugandan opposition general charged at court martial: lawyer

Deploying AU force without Burundi approval 'unimaginable': AU official

Head of Libya's unity government meets army chief

WATER WORLD
U.K. regulators give the go ahead to modify human embryos

Humans evolved by sharing technology and culture

How environmental awareness helped the Bushmen to poison their game

New research sharpens understanding of poison-arrow hunting in Africa




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News






The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2017 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. All articles labeled "by Staff Writers" include reports supplied to Space Media Network by industry news wires, PR agencies, corporate press officers and the like. Such articles are individually curated and edited by Space Media Network staff on the basis of the report's information value to our industry and professional readership. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement