Earth Science News  





.
SHAKE AND BLOW
Toll from Guatemala, Mexico landslides rises above 50

Devastating Mexico flooding to worsen: state governor
Villahermosa, Mexico (AFP) Sept 8, 2010 - Floods that have affected almost one million people in the south and east of Mexico will likely worsen after the opening of a dam and predictions of more rain, a state governor said Wednesday. "Heavy rains are predicted, not only in Tabasco (state) but also in the whole south-southeastern region, including storms and hurricanes... which would put us in a more critical situation," Tabasco governor Andres Granier told local journalists. The opening of the region's Penitas dam could release up to 2,000 cubic meters of water per second to the Carrizal and Samaria rivers, which were already at critical levels, Granier said. "The worrying thing is that for people in Tabasco, the worst -- our real rainy season -- is starting now," he added.

The states of Veracruz, Oaxaca and Tabasco were the worst hit in the floods that swept through entire towns and affected more than 900,000 people in some way, according to state civil protection officials. The total toll from the heaviest rains in living memory in Guatemala and Mexico rose above 50 on Tuesday, including seven in Mexico. Guatemalan officials on Tuesday called off the search for 15 more corpses over safety fears. In Mexico, President Felipe Calderon said rainfall was more than three and a half times the average during a visit to Tabasco Tuesday, blaming the situation on climate change. Some 200,000 hectares (500,000 acres) of land were submerged, affecting more than 20,000 farmers in the region, officials said.
by Staff Writers
Guatemala City (AFP) Sept 7, 2010
The toll from the heaviest rains in living memory in Guatemala and Mexico rose above 50 on Tuesday, as Guatemalan officials called off the search for 15 more corpses over safety fears.

Mexican authorities said three workers cleaning a drainage system in the center of the country had been buried by rocks and mud dislodged from a nearby hill, taking the toll there to at least seven after a week of downpours.

In Guatemala, where at least 45 people died over the weekend, rescuers had just resumed the grim task of digging for bodies in a ravine next to the Pan-American Highway when officials decided the sodden terrain was unsafe.

"The search has been called off because of the condition of the ground," said David de Leon, a spokesman for the government's emergency management office CONRED.

Many of Guatemala's dead perished Saturday when dozens of rescuers were buried alive as they tried to find victims of an earlier landslide that swept a bus and five other vehicles off the highway.

Only 25 of the 40 people believed to have been buried at the site have been retrieved.

"We brought shovels and spades and we were starting to help when another landslide came," said Manuel Sohom, who lost his 15-year-old son.

They were only a few meters away from each other but "it all happened so fast we didn't have time to do anything," he said, through tears.

"The mud covered me up to my chest and I was able to get out, but the others were completely buried and my son remained under the earth."

The rains triggered almost 200 landslides and collapses, causing at least 500 million dollars worth of damage, according to the government, which ordered three days of national mourning and declared a state of emergency.

President Alvaro Colom said Sunday that the impact of the heaviest rains in 60 years would be worse due to a shortage of government funds after Tropical Storm Agatha, which killed 165 people and left thousands homeless in May.

On Tuesday, he riled against opposition lawmakers for holding up a 163-million-dollar emergency funding bill to rebuild the country after the devastating rains.

Colom called on Guatemalans to "pull together in dealing with the emergency and reconstruction efforts, and later to create a culture respectful of the environment, to reduce the impact of natural catastrophes."

In Washington, the United States said it has requested 50,000 dollars in emergency aid for flood-hit Guatemala and reprogrammed another 4.38 million dollars in economic aid for recovery efforts.

The United Nations said it would send 20,000 food rations to help those affected by the floods.

After Guatemala, it was Mexico's turn to suffer as the torrential rains moved north, affecting some 600,000 people in the south and east of the country, according to the Mexican authorities.

Mexican President Felipe Calderon said the recent series of tropical storms had provoked the heaviest rains ever recorded in the southeastern state of Tabasco.

"The past months of July and August have seen the highest amount of rain recorded in all history, either memorized or recorded," Calderon said during a visit to the region.

Rainfall was more than three and a half times the average for those months, he said, blaming the situation on climate change.

Calderon also warned citizens to brace for more bad weather since the rainy season in Tabasco traditionally ramps up in October and November and even into December.

Tropical Storm Hermine, meanwhile, slammed into far northeastern Mexico and then barreled into US territory early Tuesday, threatening storm surges, flash floods and tornadoes on both sides of the border.

Other countries hit with recent flooding and mudslides included Honduras, where floods killed 55 people, Nicaragua, where 40 people died and El Salvador, where nine people were killed.

burs/fgf/oh




Share This Article With Planet Earth
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit
YahooMyWebYahooMyWeb GoogleGoogle FacebookFacebook



Related Links
Bringing Order To A World Of Disasters
When the Earth Quakes
A world of storm and tempest



Tempur-Pedic Mattress Comparison

Newsletters :: SpaceDaily Express :: SpaceWar Express :: TerraDaily Express :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News
SHAKE AND BLOW
Toll from Guatemala, Mexico landslides rises above 50
Guatemala City (AFP) Sept 7, 2010
The toll from the heaviest rains in living memory in Guatemala and Mexico rose Tuesday above 50, as Guatemalan officials called off the search for 15 more corpses because of safety fears. Mexican authorities said three workers cleaning a drainage system in the center of the country had been buried by rocks and mud dislodged from a nearby hill, taking the toll there after a week of downpours ... read more

.
Get Our Free Newsletters Via Email
  


SHAKE AND BLOW
Christchurch quake may have silver lining for NZ economy

Saving flood-hit Pakistan has global implications: UNDP

Eerie silence as army takes charge in NZ quake zone

Stalled funding hits Pakistan aid effort: UN

SHAKE AND BLOW
GOCE Gravity Mission Back In Action

ISRO To Launch Two More Satellites By December

Bacteria could make self-healing concrete

Scientists create 'smarter' materials

SHAKE AND BLOW
Brazil seeks more control on sea resources

Marine Animals Suggest Evidence For A Trans-Antarctic Seaway

Contamination leaves 1.2 million Malaysians without water

Kazakh leader calls for diverting Siberian rivers south

SHAKE AND BLOW
Study: Earth's last ice age not worldwide

Climate: New study slashes estimate of icecap loss

Fuel tanker runs aground in Canadian Arctic: coast guard

Researchers Find A 'great Fizz' Of Carbon Dioxide At The End Of The Last Ice Age

SHAKE AND BLOW
Prince Charles throws open garden for green festival

Erratic global weather threatens food security: experts

Walker's World: The food crisis

NGOs call for Romanian minister to be sacked for GM links

SHAKE AND BLOW
Cape Verde on alert as Tropical Storm Igor forms

Toll from Guatemala, Mexico landslides rises above 50

New Zealand extends emergency following aftershock

New Zealand quake hits beer supplies at major brewery

SHAKE AND BLOW
Nigeria leader replaces military, security heads: presidency

Congo dispute could hurt Africa investment

Safari Slovaks held in plot claim freed: C.Africa

U.S. tries to curb looting of Congo

SHAKE AND BLOW
New Climate Change Mitigation Schemes Could Benefit Elites More Than Poor

Internet an equalizer for people with disabilities

First Clear Evidence Of Feasting In Early Humans

The Mother Of All Humans


The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2010 - SpaceDaily. AFP and UPI Wire Stories are copyright Agence France-Presse and United Press International. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by SpaceDaily on any Web page published or hosted by SpaceDaily. Privacy Statement