Subscribe free to our newsletters via your
. Earth Science News .

Subscribe free to our newsletters via your

Virus in Chinese ducks could infect humans

disclaimer: image is for illustration purposes only
by Staff Writers
Beijing (UPI) Mar 29, 2011
Ducks, an important item in Chinese cuisine, have been felled by a new virus threatening Chinese duck farms, agricultural officials in that country say.

Last year Chinese farmers noticed their prized birds were producing fewer eggs than usual, and egg production plummeted by as much as 90 percent in some flocks. Ducks were waddling about awkwardly, their coordination hampered, and eating less than usual. Some died within days.

By the end of the year some 4.4 million ducks in the eastern provinces of Fujian, Shandong and Zhejiang, where duck farming is common, had caught the mysterious illness, AAAS reported Tuesday.

Scientists at the Chinese Academy of Sciences in Beijing analyzed the affected animals and discovered an aggressive new flavivirus, a class of viruses that includes those that cause yellow and dengue fevers.

It was the first flavivirus ever identified in ducks.

In addition to potentially affecting Chinese duck farming and the economy that depends on it, the flavivirus could put humans at risk, researchers said.

"Most flaviviruses are zoonotic," meaning they can be transmitted from animals to people, microbiologist George Gao of the science academy said, "so infection of human beings cannot be ruled out."

Because of the pervasiveness of duck farming in China, Gao said, the disease should be closely monitored, in part because it could spread to people.

Share This Article With Planet Earth DiggDigg RedditReddit
YahooMyWebYahooMyWeb GoogleGoogle FacebookFacebook

Related Links
Epidemics on Earth - Bird Flu, HIV/AIDS, Ebola

Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News

To Meet, Greet Or Retreat During Influenza Outbreaks
Washington DC (SPX) Mar 30, 2011
When influenza pandemics arrive, the specter of disease spread through person-to-person contact can mean that schools close, hand sanitizer sales rise, and travellers stay home. But is severing social and business interactions with our neighbors really better than taking a chance on getting sick? "Infectious disease can mean making trade-offs between the risks and rewards of meeting others ... read more

Japan nuclear plant's disaster plan inadequate: report

Hundreds of bodies in Japan nuclear exclusion zone: report

Japan says no need to evacuate village near nuclear plant

Japan nuclear refugees feel 'betrayed'

Radiation in sea off Japan nuclear plant 4,385 times limit

Fukushima a threat to Pacific people?

Japan disasters could send gadget prices higher

Cancer Risk Of Backscatter Airport Scanners Is Low

Police, protesters clash over China dam

First Broad-Scale Maps Of Life On The Sea-Shelf

Dolphin toll from BP oil spill far higher: study

ADB and OPEC Fund aid Sierra Leone water project

Antarctic Icebergs Play A Previously Unknown Role In Global Carbon Cycle, Climate

Study Sheds Light On How Heat Is Transported To Greenland Glaciers

Large-Scale Assessment Of Arctic Ocean Show Significant Increase In Freshwater Content

Study: 2011 arctic ice extent is down

EU talks on modified foods break down

Japan finds radiation above legal limit in beef: report

'Super' salmon resist climate change better: study

Philippines cracks down on Chinese poachers

Thai floods kill 15 dead, thousands stranded

Climate Modelling And The Rain

Deep-Sea Volcanoes Explode

A mother's search in post-tsunami Japan

Ivory Coast opposition blockade lifted, police desert: UN

A New Scramble For African Riches - Its Consumers

Africa turns to cellphones for better health

Sudan president heads to Qatar amid Darfur violence

Parody blooms on Twitter

Chatting babies video a YouTube sensation

Research Proves No 2 Of Us Are Alike, Even Identical Twins

Researchers Detail How Neurons Decide How To Transmit Information

The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2010 - SpaceDaily. AFP and UPI Wire Stories are copyright Agence France-Presse and United Press International. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by SpaceDaily on any Web page published or hosted by SpaceDaily. Privacy Statement