Subscribe free to our newsletters via your
. Earth Science News .


Subscribe free to our newsletters via your




















WATER WORLD
Water-cleaning chemical made 'on-demand' with new group of catalysts
by Staff Writers
Cardiff, UK (SPX) Feb 29, 2016


File image.

A quick, cheap and highly efficient method for producing a water-purifying chemical has been developed by researchers at Cardiff University.

The team, from the Cardiff Catalyst Institute, Lehigh University and the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory in the USA, have developed a new group of catalysts that can produce hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) on-demand in a simple one-step process, opening up the possibility of manufacturing the chemical in some of the poorest, remote and disaster-stricken areas of the world.

Their results have been published in the journal Science. A video explaining the work of the Cardiff Catalysis Institute can be viewed here.

"Using our new catalyst, we've created a method of efficiently producing H2O2 on-demand in a quick, one-step process," said co-author of the study Dr Simon Freakley from the Cardiff Catalysis Institute.

"Being able to produce H2O2 directly opens up a whole host of possibilities, most notably in the field of water purification where it would be indispensable to be able to produce the chemical on-site where safe and clean drinking water is at a premium."

Over four million tonnes of H2O2 are produced by industry each year, predominantly through a large, multi-step process, which requires highly concentrated solutions of H2O2 to be transported before dilution at the point of use. Current uses of H2O2 include paper bleaching, disinfecting and water treatment and in the chemical synthesis industry.

Though centralised systems adequately supply clean water to billions of households around the world, many people still do not have access to these large-scale water supplies and must therefore rely on decentralised systems for a safe source of water.

The team, led by Professor Graham Hutchings, has previously developed a state-of-the-art catalyst made from palladium and gold nanoparticles that helped to create H2O2 from hydrogen and oxygen.

Now the team have shown that gold can be replaced with five different readily available metals, including tin, zinc and cobalt, to form a much cheaper and more efficient group of catalysts for this specific reaction.

Co-author of the study Professor Graham Hutchings said: "Our new catalyst shows that it is possible to achieve equally high utilisation of hydrogen to form hydrogen peroxide by replacing the gold in the catalysts with cheap readily available metals, therefore significantly reducing costs.

"Rather than replace the current industrial process, we envisage this catalyst being used where low concentrations of hydrogen peroxide are required. For example, we could see our catalyst being used in decentralised water purification systems in which the speedy, on-demand production of hydrogen peroxide would be essential.

"We are already in discussions with industry to see how this catalyst can be developed further."

.


Related Links
Cardiff University
Water News - Science, Technology and Politics






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

Previous Report
WATER WORLD
NASA Demonstrates Airborne Water Quality Sensor
Pasadena CA (JPL) Feb 26, 2016
Monitoring the quality of freshwater supplies is a global concern, especially in thirsty California, where the San Francisco Bay-Delta Estuary and its watershed serve as a major freshwater source. Now scientists at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, and the U.S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park and Sacramento, California, have successfully demonstrated how a NASA-developed airb ... read more


WATER WORLD
Brazil police charge seven in Samarco mine deaths: reports

MH370 lawsuits gain pace as two-year deadline nears

Aid finally getting to Fiji cyclone victims

Nuclear water: Fukushima still faces contamination crisis

WATER WORLD
New research introduces 'pause button' for boiling

Real or virtual - can we tell the difference

Breakthrough in dynamically variable negative stiffness structures

Eco-friendly food packaging material doubles shelf-life of food products

WATER WORLD
Sea-level rise past and future: Robust estimates for coastal planners

Climate change speeds up gully erosion

Researchers sequence seagrass genome, unlocking valuable resource

Herring fishery's strength is in the sum of its parts, study finds

WATER WORLD
OGC requests information to guide Arctic Spatial Data Pilot

Australian icebreaker runs aground in Antarctica

Study of tundra soil demonstrates vulnerability of ecosystem to climate warming

Ice age blob of warm ocean water discovered south of Greenland

WATER WORLD
New wheat genetic advancements aimed at yield enhancement

China's Jack Ma buys French vineyard

PM tells drought-stricken Thailand to cut rice production

Scientists draw first European earthworm map

WATER WORLD
Fiji eyes more cyclone aid as toll hits 44

Fiji cyclone death toll rises to 42: official

Cyclone death toll hits 29 as Fiji eyes long clean-up

Christchurch commemorates devastating quake

WATER WORLD
Voice of China: Beijing seeks African friends and influence

Kenya army says it killed Shebab intelligence chief

Three soldiers get life for I.Coast military chief's murder

Saving the wildlife 'miracle' of Congo's Garamba park

WATER WORLD
Easter Island not destroyed by war, analysis of 'spear points' shows

Neanderthals and modern H. sapiens crossbred over 100,000 years ago

Neanderthals mated with modern humans much earlier than previously thought

Modern 'Indiana Jones' on mission to save antiquities




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News








The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2016 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement All images and articles appearing on Space Media Network have been edited or digitally altered in some way. Any requests to remove copyright material will be acted upon in a timely and appropriate manner. Any attempt to extort money from Space Media Network will be ignored and reported to Australian Law Enforcement Agencies as a potential case of financial fraud involving the use of a telephonic carriage device or postal service.