Subscribe free to our newsletters via your
. Earth Science News .

Subscribe free to our newsletters via your

Water supplies in Tibet set to increase in the future
by Staff Writers
Gothenburg, Sweden (SPX) Jan 21, 2016

Professor Deliang Chen, seen here on the Tibetan Plateau. Image courtesy University of Gothenburg. For a larger version of this image please go here.

The Tibetan Plateau has long been seen as a "hotspot" for international environmental research, and there have been fears that water supplies in the major Asian rivers would drastically decline in the near future. However, new research now shows that water supplies will be stable and may even increase in the coming decades.

A report by the International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) from 2007 suggests that the glaciers in the Himalayas will be gone by 2035. This statement was questioned and caused a great stir.

"This mistaken claim and the subsequent debate pointed to a need for a better understanding of the dynamics of climate, glaciers and future water supplies in the region," says Deliang Chen, Professor in the Department of Earth Sciences at the University of Gothenburg.

River flows stable or increasing
Since the statement by IPCC in 2007, the Tibetan Plateau has been a focus of international environmental research.

A research group led by Professor Deliang Chen at the University of Gothenburg, in close collaboration with researchers from the Institute of Tibetan Plateau Research at the Chinese Academy of Sciences, headed by Professor Fengge Su, has studied future climate change and its effect on the water balance in the region. The great Asian rivers have their source on the Plateau or in the neighbouring mountains.

The researchers recently published a study in Global and Planetary Change which modelled the water flows upstream in the Yellow River, the Yangtze, the Mekong, the Salween, the Brahmaputra and the Indus. The studies include both data from past decades and simulations for future decades.

The results show that water flows in the rivers in the coming decades would either be stable or would increase compared to the period from 1971-2000.

Affects a third of the world's population
The Tibetan Plateau is the highest and most extensive area of high land in the world, and what happens there affects water resources for almost a third of the world's population.

Dr. Tinghai Ou, who was responsible for the climate projections in the study, has commented that increased precipitation and meltwater from glaciers and snowfall are contributing to increased water flows in the region.

"This is good news because social and economic development in the surrounding areas, including China, India, Nepal and other countries in Southeast Asia, are closely tied to climate change and access to water. But the fact that the glaciers are shrinking in the region could be a concern in the longer term, and we must keep a close eye on what is happening with global warming," says Professor Deliang Chen.


Related Links
University of Gothenburg
Water News - Science, Technology and Politics

Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

Previous Report
Obama declares emergency over foul water in Michigan
Washington (AFP) Jan 16, 2016
US President Barack Obama declared a state of emergency in Michigan on Saturday, freeing up federal aid to help an area affected by contaminated water, the White House said. Authorities in the state have been dealing with a major health crisis over lead-contaminated water that arose from cost-cutting measures implemented in the city of Flint, home to some 100,000 people. Problems arose a ... read more

Charities warn of 'desperate' plight of refugees in snow

Nepal quake rebuilding to take years, new chief says

MH370 search finds new shipwreck, but no plane

Six years on, quake-devastated Haiti mourns its dead

Recycling light

Polymer puts new medical solutions within reach

All-antiferromagnetic memory could get digital data storage in a spin

It's a 3-D printer, but not as we know it

Livermore scientists find global ocean warming has doubled in recent decades

Global warming strikes deep into oceans: study

Living fossils and rare corals revealed

Volunteers send water as S.African temperatures soar

Mounting evidence suggests early agriculture staved off global cooling

Ancient underwater volcanoes may have ended 'Snowball Earth'

Study finds high melt rates on Antarctica's most stable ice shelf

Human-made climate change suppresses the next ice age

Eating less meat might not be the way to go green

A tree or not a tree? India's Goa rows over coconut status

S.Africa to import maize after driest season in 100 years

Bird flu detected in US turkey flock

Kobe marks 21 years since killer quake

More than 1,200 flee as Indonesia volcano spews ash, gas

Study: Mild winter followed ancient eruption of Toba volcano

Evidence of large volcanic activity in the Caribbean uncovered

Several dead as Shebab storm African Union base in Somalia

China's imports from Africa plummet in 2015: officials

Niger holds 13 over failed December coup

Mali extends state of emergency until March 31

Study: 920,000 Pygmies living in forests of Central Africa

Harmful mutations have accumulated during early human migrations out of Africa

Chimp friendships are based on trust

Brain monitoring takes a leap out of the lab

Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News

The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2016 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement All images and articles appearing on Space Media Network have been edited or digitally altered in some way. Any requests to remove copyright material will be acted upon in a timely and appropriate manner. Any attempt to extort money from Space Media Network will be ignored and reported to Australian Law Enforcement Agencies as a potential case of financial fraud involving the use of a telephonic carriage device or postal service.