Free Newsletters - Space - Defense - Environment - Energy - Solar - Nuclear
..
. Earth Science News .




WATER WORLD
Water users can reduce the risk of spreading invasive species
by Staff Writers
Leeds, UK (SPX) Apr 17, 2014


File image.

Foreign species that are devastating water ecosystems could be "hitchhiking" around Britain on canoeists' and anglers' kit, according to a new study.

Invaders like the killer shrimp, zebra mussel and American signal crayfish have already caused extensive environmental damage and millions of pounds of economic costs.

The new research, led by the University of Leeds and the Centre for Environment Fisheries and Aquaculture Science (Cefas), found that the cleaning habits of anglers and canoeists could be a key part of the problem.

The study, based on a survey of more than 1,500 water sports enthusiasts across the UK, found that 64% of anglers and 79% of canoeists used their equipment in more than one waterway in a fortnight.

A significant proportion of those people (12% of anglers and 50% of canoeists) said they did not clean or dry their kit before moving to the new waters.

Dr Alison Dunn, Reader in Evolutionary Ecology in the University of Leeds' Faculty of Biological Sciences, who led the Leeds group, said: "This is really alarming because some of the most dangerous invasive species can easily survive in damp equipment.

"The killer shrimp, for instance can live in a fold of a wetsuit or an angling net for about 15 days. Once it gets into the new water system, it is voracious. It will take bites out of things and leave them uneaten, killing when it doesn't need to eat. The native shrimp is replaced, food stocks vital to other species are depleted and the ecosystems can be devastated."

In 2011, the Government, in partnership with a large number of environmental NGO's, launched a "Check, Clean, Dry" campaign to try to address the issue by encouraging water users to clean their gear before moving to new sites. While there has been significant support for the campaign, the study shows that there is still some way to go to further reduce the risk.

It also shows a risk of direct importation of new species from abroad. Eight percent of anglers and 28 per cent of canoeists reported using their equipment overseas without cleaning or drying it on their return.

Co-author Dr Paul Stebbing of Cefas said: "The killer shrimp is not the only invader capable of 'hitchhiking' into new ecosystems on water sports equipment. The signal crayfish, which has been laying waste to native white-clawed crayfish populations, persists between three and seven days. Some invasive viruses and diseases can survive well over a month."

The lead researcher on the study, Lucy Anderson of the University of Leeds' Faculty of Biological Sciences, said: "There are 4 million anglers and more than 400,000 boat owners in the UK and the frequency with which people are using their equipment at different sites suggests that they may be an important pathway for invasive species. Once invasive species establish in rivers and lakes, they're almost impossible to eradicate, so preventing their introduction and further spread in the first place is the best way that we have of controlling them."

The "Check, Clean, Dry" campaign asks water sports participants to:

+ Check all gear and clothing for live organisms, particularly in areas that are hard to inspect.

+ Clean and wash all clothing, footwear and equipment properly.

+ Dry all equipment thoroughly as many species can live for many days in moist conditions.

Dr Niall Moore, head of the Non-native Species Secretariat for Great Britain (NNSS), the official body responsible for fighting invasive species, said: "Invasive species can affect fish and other wildlife, restrict navigation, clog up propellers and be costly to manage.

"This research highlights the fact that water users in the UK may unknowingly be involved in moving these species between UK waterways on their shoes, clothing and equipment. We urge water users to help protect the water ways they love by following three simple steps when they leave the water: Check, Clean, Dry."

The research was conducted by researchers at the University of Leeds, University of York, and Cefas. It was funded by the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) and Cefas.

.


Related Links
University of Leeds
Water News - Science, Technology and Politics






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





WATER WORLD
Not so dirty: Methane fuels life in pristine chalk rivers
London, UK (SPX) Apr 08, 2014
Scientists from Queen Mary University of London have found that naturally high concentrations of the greenhouse gas methane contributes to energy production in chalk rivers, in a new study published in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B. Chalk rivers, found from Dorset to Cambridgeshire, sustain a diverse range of protected animals and plants, and are renowned globally for fly ... read more


WATER WORLD
Malaysia vows to be transparent with 'black box' data

Solomons flood victims 'terrified' after quakes

Survey finds majority of Malaysians distrust govt on MH370

Mini-sub to dive again after aborting first MH370 search

WATER WORLD
Vanguard Space Technologies Antenna Reflectors on Amazonas Satellite Launch

Middle Eastern country orders more border radar

Headwall Extends Global Reach in Asia/Pac and Israel

A new twist for better steel

WATER WORLD
Mini-sub deploys to scour ocean depths in MH370 hunt

Uncharted depths provide reality check for MH370 hunt

Reef fish arrived in two waves

A small coral-eating worm may mean big trouble for reefs

WATER WORLD
Growth of Antarctic ice sheet triggered warming in the Southern Ocean during Miocene

New technology helps paleontologists see Ice-Age bee in intricate detail

Canada boycotts Arctic Council meeting in Moscow

La Brea Tar Pit fossil research shows climate change drove evolution of Ice Age predators

WATER WORLD
Climate: Farming emissions to rise 30% by 2050

Oyster aquaculture could significantly improve Potomac River estuary water quality

Danone says China recall weighs on first-quarter sales

GM crops under the microscope at international debate

WATER WORLD
Increase in activity at DRC's Nyamulagira volcano

Magnitude 7.5 quake strikes off Solomon Islands: USGS

Cyclone warning lifted on Australia's Barrier Reef coast

Death toll rises to 23 in Solomons floods

WATER WORLD
Obama to meet Djibouti President on May 5

Campaigning conservationist shot in DR Congo

US Marines headed to Chad park to fight poaching

Top Nigerian Islamic body accuses military over Muslim deaths

WATER WORLD
Researchers say Neanderthals were no strangers to good parenting

Evolution explains facial hair trends

New method confirms humans and Neandertals interbred

Indigenous societies' 'first contact' typically brings collapse, but rebounds are possible




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement All images and articles appearing on Space Media Network have been edited or digitally altered in some way. Any requests to remove copyright material will be acted upon in a timely and appropriate manner. Any attempt to extort money from Space Media Network will be ignored and reported to Australian Law Enforcement Agencies as a potential case of financial fraud involving the use of a telephonic carriage device or postal service.