Subscribe to our free daily newsletters
. Earth Science News .




Subscribe to our free daily newsletters



WATER WORLD
Where the Jordan stops flowing
by Staff Writers
Tel Aviv, Israel (SPX) Apr 04, 2017


File image.

A new study conducted at Tel Aviv University and published in the journal Water Research argues that Israel's Jordan River may be a useful case study for the challenges facing stream restoration initiatives around the world. The Jordan River has been ravaged by unbridled population growth and defunct sewage treatment plants.

"No river enjoys better PR and has worse environmental conditions than the Jordan River," said Prof. Alon Tal, Chair of TAU's Department of Public Policy, who led the research. "The river has a biblical pedigree and the potential to bring about environmental cooperation."

The Jordan River now has only 3% of its original flow. It has been decimated by a drop in water supply as a result of population growth, climate change, and contamination from a range of pollution sources. Human wastewater and even fish ponds contribute to the extremely poor water quality.

"While the rehabilitation of the Jordan River is of mutual concern to Israel, Jordan, and the Palestinians, the benefits of this rehabilitation have been extremely difficult to convey to decisionmakers, who are aware of how much they must spend to create them," Prof. Tal said. "When the water evaporates, though, wells run dry and agricultural systems and communities quickly collapse."

According to Prof. Tal's research, a two-pronged strategy that would both remove pollution sources and increase water flow to revive associated ecosystems requires regional cooperation.

"A restoration strategy requires ensuring a minimum flow and removing all pollution sources," said Prof. Tal. "We would also need to develop a program for ecologically sensitive tourism that will provide critical justification for ongoing commitment to environmental protection by all parties, regardless of their relative levels of prosperity.

"Regional thinking is critical to overcoming the population pressures of scarcity. Only a focused strategy that engages all the countries in the watershed can lead to a sustainable future for this iconic water resource. If we can't find he political will and economic resources required to revive a small, iconic river like the Jordan, it will be that much more difficult to find politicians and donors who will provide the funds to bring less famous streams back to life."

A cautionary tale
According to Prof. Tal, the case of the Jordan River has direct bearing on water-scarce regions around the world. China alone has some 24,000 rivers that are drying up.

Desalination, the process of removing salts and minerals from saline water to produce water suitable for human consumption or irrigation, has been hailed as a game-changer in countries long suffering from freshwater scarcity and has produced unique opportunities for cooperation in the region.

But while desalination facilities have been instrumental in improving water supplies for populations around the world, they have not solved the crisis facing the planet's rivers and streams, including the Jordan River.

"People are mistakenly euphoric about desalination," said Prof. Tal. "Israel recycles 86% of its wastewater and is considered revolutionary in terms of its water management, but even Israel can't get a handle on the Jordan River. Our study is a response to those who think that if you can desalinate water, you don't have a water crisis. Let them come to the Jordan River and see for themselves."

Research paper

WATER WORLD
Internationally traded crops are shrinking globe's underground aquifers
Washington (UPI) Mar 28, 2017
Some of the most popular crops on the planet rely on agricultural irrigation, a practice shrinking water resources across the globe. According to new analysis by researchers at NASA, irrigation for a handful of internationally traded crops accounts for 11 percent of non-renewable groundwater withdrawals - that is the water drawn from underground aquifers and won't be replenished on hum ... read more

Related Links
American Friends of Tel Aviv University
Water News - Science, Technology and Politics


Thanks for being here;
We need your help. The SpaceDaily news network continues to grow but revenues have never been harder to maintain.

With the rise of Ad Blockers, and Facebook - our traditional revenue sources via quality network advertising continues to decline. And unlike so many other news sites, we don't have a paywall - with those annoying usernames and passwords.

Our news coverage takes time and effort to publish 365 days a year.

If you find our news sites informative and useful then please consider becoming a regular supporter or for now make a one off contribution.

SpaceDaily Contributor
$5 Billed Once


credit card or paypal
SpaceDaily Monthly Supporter
$5 Billed Monthly


paypal only

Comment using your Disqus, Facebook, Google or Twitter login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

WATER WORLD
Mosul humanitarian crisis deepens as displacement peaks

Colombia opens probe into deadly landslide

Trump's visceral response prompts Syria strikes

Over 6,000 flee 'terrifying' violence in S.Sudan town: UN

WATER WORLD
Laser sensors spot trees with larch disease

New bioactive foam could replace lost skull bone

A self-healing, water-repellant coating that's ultra durable

Granites could solve riddle of pinpointing metals crucial for low carbon tech

WATER WORLD
Where the Jordan stops flowing

L3 Technologies acquires autonomous underwater robot manufacturer

Dead Sea to come alive with concert by electro pioneer

Blockbuster nature series catches dynamite fishermen on film

WATER WORLD
Microbial colonizers of Arctic soils are sensitive to future climate change

Some of Greenland's coastal ice will be permanently lost by 2100

Arctic Ocean becoming more like the Atlantic, scientists say

Paintings, sunspots and frost fairs: Rethinking the Little Ice Age

WATER WORLD
New global report on food crisis

Domesticated rice goes rogue

A 'bionic leaf' could help feed the world

11 percent of disappearing groundwater used to grow internationally traded food

WATER WORLD
Relief as flood peak passes in Australia town

Project Hotspot

Quake kills two near Iran Shiite holy city Mashhad

Australia floodwaters still rising, police search for missing

WATER WORLD
15 Burkina troops jailed over arms depot raid

Boko Haram kills Nigerian troops after deadly raid on farmers

Mali peace conference calls for talks with jihadists

'Executed' Gambian coup plotters exhumed

WATER WORLD
Married couples with shared ancestry tend to have similar genes

Great apes know when people are wrong: study

Researchers uncover prehistoric art and ornaments from Indonesian 'Ice Age'

Parallel computation provides deeper insight into brain function




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News






The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2017 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. All articles labeled "by Staff Writers" include reports supplied to Space Media Network by industry news wires, PR agencies, corporate press officers and the like. Such articles are individually curated and edited by Space Media Network staff on the basis of the report's information value to our industry and professional readership. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement