Earth Science News  





. World's Protected Areas Threatened By Climate Change

The study also identified "refuge" countries where protected areas face minimal risk from climate change, including Botswana, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Guinea-Bissau, Liberia, Libya, Madagascar, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Saudi Arabia, Sierra Leone and Somalia.
by Staff Writers
Denpasar, Indonesia (SPX) Dec 11, 2007
Climate change will affect national parks, forest reserves and other protected areas around the world, in some cases altering conditions so severely that the resulting environments will be virtually new to the planet, according to a study presented at the U.N. climate change talks in Bali, Indonesia.

Scientists from Conservation International (CI), the University of Wisconsin and the University of Maryland analyzed the World Protected Areas Database with ten Global Climate Models and three different scenarios examined by the U.N. Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.

They found that under the most likely scenario, more than half the world's protected territory is vulnerable to impacts of climate change, with some regions facing the disappearance of current climatic conditions by 2100 or a transition to conditions not found on Earth in the previous century.

"We previously assumed that if the land is protected, then the plants and animals living there will persist," said Sandy Andelman, lead author of the study and CI's vice president who heads the Tropical Ecology Assessment and Monitoring (TEAM) network. "That may be wishful thinking."

Countries where 90 percent or more of the total protected territory has climate conditions that will disappear globally or be transformed to novel climates are Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Colombia, Cuba, Ecuador, Ethiopia, Ghana, Guyana, Ivory Coast, Mexico, Niger, Rwanda, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Swaziland, Togo, Uganda and Venezuela.

With millions of people living in the most seriously affected countries, maintaining the health of protected areas and the biological diversity they contain is crucial to the availability of fresh water, food, medicines and other life-sustaining benefits of nature.

However, the study indicates that climate change will cause increased extinctions of species unable to adapt to altered climatic conditions, and substantial changes to the natural ecosystems.

"We urgently need to better understand how climate change will affect life on Earth so we can develop solutions, and to do that we need consistent data about long-term trends at a very large scale," Andelman said.

Her TEAM network, established through CI funding, monitors such long-term trends in the biological diversity of tropical forests. A network of tropical field stations using standardized methods of data collection allows scientists anywhere on Earth to quantify how tropical nature is responding to climate change and human impacts. The first five TEAM sites operate in tropical forests across Latin America, with the program expanding to Africa and Asia by the end of 2008 and plans for 20 sites on three continents by the end of 2009.

The study also identified "refuge" countries where protected areas face minimal risk from climate change, including Botswana, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Guinea-Bissau, Liberia, Libya, Madagascar, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Saudi Arabia, Sierra Leone and Somalia. Ensuring the adequate protection of nature reserves in these countries will provide baseline information to help understand the dynamics of biological diversity relatively unaffected by climate change.

Along with Andelman, the paper's authors are Jan Dempewolf of the University of Maryland, Jack Williams of the University of Wisconsin, and two members of CI's Center for Applied Biodiversity Science - Jenny Hewson, a remote sensing specialist, and Erica Ashkenazi, a GIS specialist.

Community
Email This Article
Comment On This Article

Related Links
Conservation International
Climate Science News - Modeling, Mitigation Adaptation




Tempur-Pedic Mattress Comparison

Newsletters :: SpaceDaily Express :: SpaceWar Express :: TerraDaily Express :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News
Nitrous Oxide From Ocean Microbes
London, UK (SPX) Dec 11, 2007
A large amount of the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide is produced by bacteria in the oxygen poor parts of the ocean using nitrites, Dr Mark Trimmer told journalists at a Science Media Centre press briefing. Dr Trimmer looked at nitrous oxide production in the Arabian Sea, which accounts for up to 18% of global ocean emissions. He found that the gas is primarily produced by bacteria trying to make nitrogen gas.

.
Get Our Free Newsletters Via Email
  



  • Flood damage in northwest US may run into billions: governor
  • Massive landslide threatening homes in central Austria: authorities
  • More deaths as storms exit the Philippines
  • NORTHCOM Experience Lends Lessons To Bangladesh Relief

  • World's Protected Areas Threatened By Climate Change
  • Climate change could lead to conflict, instability: UN report
  • Nitrous Oxide From Ocean Microbes
  • US, poor nations won't pledge binding cuts in Bali: UN

  • Outside View: Russia's new sats -- Part 2
  • Use Space Technology And IT For Rural Development
  • China, Brazil give Africa free satellite land images
  • Ministerial Summit On Global Earth Observation System Of Systems

  • Climate survey pooh-poohs biofuels
  • Wind turbines to power every British home by 2020: minister
  • Methane From Microbes: A Fuel For The Future
  • Al-Qaeda could spark US economic crisis: McCain

  • New China bird flu case raises human-to-human fear
  • China says no bird flu outbreak after father-son cases
  • Most Ancient Case Of Tuberculosis Found In 500,000-Year-Old Human; Points To Modern Health Issues
  • Scientists Strike Blow In Superbugs Struggle

  • Threatened Birds May Be Rarer Than Geographic Range Maps Suggest
  • Massive Dinosaur Discovered In Antarctica Sheds Light On Life, Distribution Of Sauropodomorphs
  • World's Most Endangered Gorilla Fights Back
  • Climate Change Will Significantly Increase Impending Bird Extinctions

  • Waterborne Carbon Increases Threat Of Environmental Mercury
  • SKorea's worst oil spill spreads along coast
  • A lone voice in China wins friends for environmental campaign
  • China reports progress on cutting pollution, but not enough

  • Scientists Develop New Measure Of Socioclimactic Risk
  • Like Humans, Monkey See, Monkey Plan, Monkey Do
  • Subliminal Smells Bias Perception About A Person's Likeability
  • Brain Systems Become Less Coordinated With Age, Even In The Absence Of Disease

  • The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2007 - SpaceDaily.AFP and UPI Wire Stories are copyright Agence France-Presse and United Press International. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by SpaceDaily on any Web page published or hosted by SpaceDaily. Privacy Statement