Subscribe free to our newsletters via your
. Earth Science News .

Zambia lifts ban on safari hunting
by Staff Writers
Lusaka (AFP) Aug 27, 2014

Zambia has lifted a 20-month ban on safari hunting because it has lost too much revenue, but lions and leopards will remain protected, the government said Wednesday.

The ban was imposed in January 2013 over allegations of corruption in the awarding of government hunting concessions, and because of fears for the future of the country's population of big cats.

"We lost too much revenue following the ban on hunting and the Zambia Wildlife Authority (ZAWA) had a lot of financial problems," Tourism Minister Jean Kapata told AFP.

Hunting fees will be raised, she added, without providing details.

ZAWA spokesperson Readith Muliyunda said in a statement that the ban on hunting of lions and leopards remained in place.

"Hunting will be conducted under laid down conditions and strict supervision from ZAWA. But the ban on big cats still stands," Muliyunda said.

The southern African country, which draws tourists to the world-famous Victoria Falls, hopes to develop a wildlife tourism trade, which has long been a mainstay of the economies in neighbouring countries.

At the time the ban was imposed, the then tourism minister Sylvia Masebo said: "We do not have enough cats for hunting purposes. The cats are gone."

ZAWA had opposed the ban, saying it would be bad for the tourism industry.

"The population of cats in Zambia is around 3,400 to 3,500, and with the ban on safari hunting for cats we are likely to lose on revenue," said ZAWA's head of research, Chuma Simukonda.

"It is these cats that make Zambia's safari hunting competitive in the region," he said.

Only 55 felines were hunted a year, he said, though the income from the sport was unknown.

Shortly before the ban was imposed, ZAWA's director and senior officials were fired for alleged corruption in the awarding of safari hunting concessions.

The country's hunting community saw the ban as political meddling.

"Blood sport is more beneficial to this country than game viewing," said Gavin Robinson of the Professional Hunters Association.

"People from Europe and America wish to hunt here but they will now move elsewhere, meaning all the clients will leave Zambia," he added.

Conservationists, however, had welcomed the ban.


Related Links
Darwin Today At

Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News

Earth can sustain more terrestrial plant growth than previously thought
Champaign IL (SPX) Aug 27, 2014
A new analysis suggests the planet can produce much more land-plant biomass - the total material in leaves, stems, roots, fruits, grains and other terrestrial plant parts - than previously thought. The study, reported in Environmental Science and Technology, recalculates the theoretical limit of terrestrial plant productivity, and finds that it is much higher than many current estimates al ... read more

China landslide kills seven: report

Japan landslides death toll hits 70 one week on

GenDyn building next-gen 911 call service for Massachusetts

Expectant newly-weds among Japan landslide missing

Photon speedway puts big data in the fast lane

The fluorescent fingerprint of plastics

Atoms to Product: Aiming to Make Nanoscale Benefits Life-sized

Yale's cool molecules

Washington State's Elwha River now dam-less, runs free

Marine protected areas might not be enough to help overfished reefs recover

Sunblock poses potential hazard to sea life

NOAA offers 20 new coral species federal protection

Sunlight, not microbes, key to CO2 in Arctic

Arctic sea ice influenced force of the Gulf Stream

Waterloo makes public most complete Antarctic map for climate research

Canada to push Arctic claim in Europe

New study charts the global invasion of crop pests

Water 'thermostat' could help engineer drought-resistant crops

Fonterra and Beingmate team up on China baby formula

How to prevent organic food fraud

Yellowstone supereruption would send ash across North America

New signs of eruption at Iceland volcano

Hurricane Cristobal kills four, churns towards Bermuda

Hurricane churns towards Bermuda, to impact US

Nigeria launches national identity card scheme

China's Xi hails Mugabe as renowned leader, old friend

Wildlife 'WikiLeaks' targets Africa poaching elite

'Crucial' to protect victims in mass trial of DRC officer

The roots of human altruism

SA's Taung Child's skull and brain not human-like in expansion

Gamblers have greedy birdbrains, new study suggests

Stone-tipped spears lethal, may indicate early cognitive and social skills

The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement All images and articles appearing on Space Media Network have been edited or digitally altered in some way. Any requests to remove copyright material will be acted upon in a timely and appropriate manner. Any attempt to extort money from Space Media Network will be ignored and reported to Australian Law Enforcement Agencies as a potential case of financial fraud involving the use of a telephonic carriage device or postal service.