Earth Science News  





. New Keys To Keeping A Diverse Planet

"Genetic diversity and species diversity depend on each other."
by Staff Writers
Davis CA (SPX) Sep 28, 2007
Variation in plants and animals gives us a rich and robust assemblage of foods, medicines, industrial materials and recreation activities. But human activities are eliminating biological diversity at an unprecedented rate. A new UC Davis study offers clues to how these losses relate to one another -- information that is essential as scientists and land managers strive to protect the remaining natural variation.

Sharon Strauss, a professor of evolution and ecology, and former doctoral student Richard Lankau (now a post-doctoral researcher at the University of Missouri-St. Louis and the University of Illinois), studied competition among genetically varied plants of one species (black mustard, Brassica nigra), and among black mustard and plants of other species.

"This is one of the first studies to show that genetic diversity and species diversity depend on each other," Lankau said. "Diversity within a species is necessary to maintain diversity among species, and at the same time, diversity among species is necessary to maintain diversity within a species.

"And if any one type is removed from the system, the cycle can break down, and the community becomes dominated by a single species."

The research was funded by the National Science Foundation. The paper, titled "Mutual feedbacks maintain both genetic and species diversity in a plant community," was published in the Sept. 14 issue of the journal Science.

The Strauss-Lankau paper is one of three papers by researchers in the UC Davis Graduate Group in Ecology that have recently been published in Science, Nature and the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science.

Community
Email This Article
Comment On This Article

Related Links
UC Davis
Darwin Today At TerraDaily.com




Tempur-Pedic Mattress Comparison

Newsletters :: SpaceDaily Express :: SpaceWar Express :: TerraDaily Express :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News
Research Team Says Extraterrestrial Impact To Blame For Ice Age Extinctions
Flagstaff AZ (SPX) Sep 25, 2007
What caused the extinction of mammoths and the decline of Stone Age people about 13,000 years ago remains hotly debated. Overhunting by Paleoindians, climate change and disease lead the list of probable causes. But an idea once considered a little out there is now hitting closer to home.

.
Get Our Free Newsletters Via Email
  



  • Northrop Grumman Completes Implementation Of Los Angeles Emergency Communication System
  • Food crisis could loom after Africa floods: Red Cross
  • Bridge Strengthening Research
  • Malaysia's Smart Satellite Teleport Plays Role In Tsunami Warning

  • Cave Records Provide Clues To Climate Change
  • Scientists Call For 80 Percent Drop In US Emissions By 2050 To Avoid Dangerous Warming
  • Global Corporate Climate Change Report Released
  • Ecuador Takes Leadership Role On Climate Change

  • Boeing Launches WorldView-1 Earth-Imaging Satellite
  • New Faraway Sensors Warn Of Emerging Hurricane's Strength
  • Key Sensor For Northrop Grumman NPOESS Program Passes Critical Structural Test
  • Air France And ESA Join To Offer Passengers Unique View Of Voyage

  • Analysis: Nigerian rebels end cease-fire
  • Analysis: Gas, oil get Myanmar off hook
  • Analysis: TAP pipeline a fantasy
  • France unveils blueprint for green revolution

  • China denies cover-up of pig disease
  • China confirms bird flu outbreak: HK official
  • Expert says climate change will spread global disease
  • Northern Iraq battles cholera 'epidemic'

  • New Keys To Keeping A Diverse Planet
  • Research Team Says Extraterrestrial Impact To Blame For Ice Age Extinctions
  • Paper Describes New Dinosaur Species Found Near Choteau
  • UT Southwestern Researchers Identify Hundreds Of Genes Controlling Female Fertility

  • China struggling to tackle rising pollution
  • Mountains of rubbish threaten Himalayan resort
  • New Microsensor Measures Volatile Organic Compounds In Water And Air On-Site
  • Pollution Causes 40 Percent Of Deaths Worldwide

  • Why Quitting May Be Good For You
  • Human Ancestors More Primitive That Once Thought
  • Music Training Linked To Enhanced Verbal Skills
  • Is There Really A Mommy Gene In Women

  • The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2007 - SpaceDaily.AFP and UPI Wire Stories are copyright Agence France-Presse and United Press International. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by SpaceDaily on any Web page published or hosted by SpaceDaily. Privacy Statement