Earth Science News  





. New Software Product Based On Sandia-Developed RAMPART

Safe at Home is part of the Home Safe line of software developed at Ducks in a Row, Inc. Home Safe is designed to help homeowners manage their risk by providing easy-to-use software that incorporates the fundamental principles of risk analysis without requiring them to learn anything about risk analysis.
by Staff Writers
Albuquerque, NM (SPX) Jul 20, 2007
Regina Hunter, retired Sandia National Laboratories employee, is launching a new software product, Safe at Home, based on Sandia-developed RAMPART. Safe at Home allows homeowners to assess risks arising from accidents, fire, crime inside or outside the house, hurricane, flood, earthquakes, tornados and winter storms. The software analyzes the risks of death, injury, property and content loss, loss of use of the home, and first-responder delays.

"Safe at Home does not require the user to have any expertise in risk analysis," Hunter says. "It asks about 200 questions and takes about half an hour to get results. Users can change their answers and get revised results in real time, allowing them to determine what changes might lessen their risks."

Sandia is a National Nuclear Security Administration laboratory.

Hunter led the development of the parent software, RAMPART, while still working at Sandia. RAMPART software is the first risk-based approach to building management. It is used by the General Services Administration (GSA) to assess the risks of terrorism, natural disasters and crime to the nearly 8,000 federal buildings it manages nationwide.

Hunter is president of Ducks in a Row, Inc., the company launching the new Safe at Home software. Ducks, which has been part of the Sandia RAMPART team since 2004, helped develop version 3.0 of RAMPART and is currently working on version 4.0, together with Susan Carson (6766), the Sandia principal investigator, and Robert Browitt of Architrave Software, Inc. Sandia awarded a licensing agreement to Ducks in a Row when Regina retired three years ago. She has been developing Safe at Home ever since.

Hunter says that in developing Safe at Home, Ducks has improved the databases used in the original RAMPART software in several ways.

"For example, Ducks has invested in substantial upgrades to data used in weighting the various hazards," Hunter says. "The new data allow the consequences of all the hazards to be put onto the same scale. Crime data have also been updated."

These improved data will probably also be used in the next version of RAMPART. Using proprietary graphics software, Ducks has also created a new and more intuitive presentation of the risk assessment results and substantially improved the appearance of natural hazard maps included in both RAMPART and Safe at Home. Ducks is providing the graphics software to Architrave for RAMPART version 4.0 development at no charge as part of the team effort.

Safe at Home is part of the Home Safe line of software developed at Ducks in a Row, Inc. Home Safe is designed to help homeowners manage their risk by providing easy-to-use software that incorporates the fundamental principles of risk analysis without requiring them to learn anything about risk analysis.

Keep it Safe lets homeowners inventory their homes, offices or collections quickly, to produce a detailed list of valuables for insurers, protecting the financial consequences of the risks analyzed by Safe at Home.

Safe and Sound, due out early next year, will help homeowners manage their health and safety risks.

"We ask people 'What have you got to lose?'" Hunter says. "Usually they don't know. They have little knowledge of the relative probabilities or consequences of manmade or natural hazards, so they tend to worry about the wrong things and invest inappropriately in home safety."

Community
Email This Article
Comment On This Article

Related Links
Sandia National Laboratories
Bringing Order To A World Of Disasters
A world of storm and tempest
When the Earth Quakes




Tempur-Pedic Mattress Comparison

Newsletters :: SpaceDaily Express :: SpaceWar Express :: TerraDaily Express :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News
RAND Study Finds Wind Insurance Costly And Scarce On Gulf Of Mexico Coast
Washington DC (SPX) Jul 19, 2007
Many businesses along the Gulf of Mexico coast have had a difficult time obtaining wind insurance coverage since Hurricanes Katrina, Rita, and Wilma hit in 2005 and have often ended up paying more than twice as much for the insurance as they did previously, according to a RAND Corporation study issued today.

.
Get Our Free Newsletters Via Email
  



  • New Software Product Based On Sandia-Developed RAMPART
  • RAND Study Finds Wind Insurance Costly And Scarce On Gulf Of Mexico Coast
  • Strict Quake Standards Spare Japan Again, But Factory Lines Suspendend
  • Let Them Raise Catfish Says Indonesian Minister As Future For Mud Volcano Victims

  • New Study Suggests Climate Change Could Be The Root Of Armed Conflicts
  • Western US States Swelter Under Record Heatwave
  • The Challenge Of Desertification
  • Australian Drought Turns To Flood As California Dries Out

  • NASA Awards Contract For Land-Imaging Instrument
  • GOP House Science Committee To Evaluate NASA Earth Science Budget
  • Subcommittee Continues Look At Status of NASA Earth Science Programs
  • QuikSCAT Marks Eight Years On-Orbit Watching Planet Earth

  • The Future Of Biofuels Is Not In Corn
  • Rural Communities Revived By New Energy Projects
  • US And Russia Facing Energy Crises
  • EERC Providing Renewable Energy Solutions For Remote Area Of Alaska

  • Tibotec HIV Drug Shows Promise
  • Non-hospital MRSA More Deadly
  • Another Potential Cure For HIV Discovered
  • Three Cases Of H5N1 Bird Flu Confirmed In Germany

  • In An Evolutionary Arms Race A Bacterium Is Found That Outwits Tomato Plant's Defenses
  • Mushroom Secrets Could Combat Carbon, Enable Better Biofuels And Clean Soil
  • Bush administration accused of putting ideology above science
  • Trophy Hunting Buoyant Industry For Namibia

  • The Sky Is Burning Over Ukraine
  • Toxic Fumes Threaten Thousands In Ukraine After Rail Crash
  • Environment Protection Efforts In China Not Sufficient Warns OECD
  • Indian Luxury Hotel Boss Calls For Major City Clean-Up

  • New Clue Into How Diet And Exercise Enhance Longevity
  • New Research Proves Single Origin Of Humans In Africa
  • Evidence Found For Novel Brain Cell Communication
  • Energy Efficiency Reason For Evolution Of Upright Walking

  • The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2007 - SpaceDaily.AFP and UPI Wire Stories are copyright Agence France-Presse and United Press International. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by SpaceDaily on any Web page published or hosted by SpaceDaily. Privacy Statement