Subscribe to our free daily newsletters
. Earth Science News .




Subscribe to our free daily newsletters



Study: African fruit is untapped resource

The Marula fruit tree.
by Staff Writers
Washington (UPI) Jan 31, 2008
A report suggests native African fruits are an untapped resource that could help combat malnutrition and boost rural development on the African continent.

The U.S. National Research Council said African science institutes, policymakers, non-governmental organizations, and individuals could use modern horticultural knowledge and scientific research to bring "lost crops" such as baobab, marula, and butterfruit to their full potential.

The report said current tropical fruit production in Africa is dominated by species introduced from Asia and the Americas, such as bananas, pineapples, and papayas. Those and other crops arrived on the African continent centuries ago. Already improved through horticultural selection and breeding, they increasingly displaced the traditional species that had fed Africans for thousands of years.

But, the report said, with renewed scientific and institutional support, Africa's native fruits could make a much greater contribution to nutrition and economic development.

The researchers said fruit trees and shrubs also offer long-term benefits by improving the stability of the environment.

The report is the third and final volume in a series that also explored the benefits of Africa's indigenous vegetable and grain crops.

Community
Email This Article
Comment On This Article

Related Links
Farming Today - Suppliers and Technology



Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News


Chinese dumplings trigger food scare in Japan
Tokyo (AFP) Jan 31, 2008
China and Japan scrambled to ease public alarm Thursday as hundreds of Japanese reported feeling ill from eating Chinese-made dumplings, triggering an emergency cabinet session in Tokyo.







  • Winter Freeze Sends Shockwaves Through China As Cash And More Run Short
  • Malawi's flood disaster set to get worse: govt official
  • China sends in army to battle snow chaos
  • Migrant workers sleeping rough in China's big freeze

  • Microbes As Climate Engineers
  • Economists Help Climate Scientists To Improve Global Warming Forecasts
  • When Accounting For The Global Nitrogen Budget Do Not Forget Fish
  • Iraq ratifies Kyoto Protocol on climate change

  • Russia To Launch Space Project To Monitor The Arctic In 2010
  • New Radar Satellite Technique Sheds Light On Ocean Current Dynamics
  • Radical New Lab Fights Disease Using Satellites
  • SPACEHAB Subsidiary Wins NASA Orbiting Carbon Observatory Contract

  • Analysis: Shell to shut again in Nigeria
  • Squeezed Crystals Deliver More Volts Per Jolt
  • Analysis: One strategy for Iraq oil, power
  • Analysis: IPI faces dangers, hurdles

  • Risk of meningitis epidemic in Burkina Faso increases
  • Analysis: NATO begins pandemic monitoring
  • China reports outbreak of bird flu in Tibet
  • Rains offer hope for bird virus outbreak

  • Telepathic Genes
  • Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Researchers Race Against Time To Save Tasmanian Devils
  • Rare dolphin 'beaten to death' in Bangladesh
  • Nonlinear Ecosystem Response Points To Environmental Solutions

  • Italy pledges to honour Naples rubbish plan after EU ultimatum
  • EU threatens Italy with court action over rubbish crisis
  • Protecting The Alps From Traffic Noise And Air Pollution
  • In Cairo the noise pollution can be a killer

  • Blue-Eyed Humans Have A Single, Common Ancestor
  • Brain Connections Strengthen During Waking Hours And Weaken During Sleep
  • Fueling And Feeding Bigfoot
  • Higher China fines for stars breaking one-child rule: state media

  • The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2007 - SpaceDaily.AFP and UPI Wire Stories are copyright Agence France-Presse and United Press International. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by SpaceDaily on any Web page published or hosted by SpaceDaily. Privacy Statement