Earth Science News  





. The earth's magnetic field impacts climate: Danish study

illustration only
by Staff Writers
Copenhagen (AFP) Jan 12, 2009
The earth's climate has been significantly affected by the planet's magnetic field, according to a Danish study published Monday that could challenge the notion that human emissions are responsible for global warming.

"Our results show a strong correlation between the strength of the earth's magnetic field and the amount of precipitation in the tropics," one of the two Danish geophysicists behind the study, Mads Faurschou Knudsen of the geology department at Aarhus University in western Denmark, told the Videnskab journal.

He and his colleague Peter Riisager, of the Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland (GEUS), compared a reconstruction of the prehistoric magnetic field 5,000 years ago based on data drawn from stalagmites and stalactites found in China and Oman.

The results of the study, which has also been published in US scientific journal Geology, lend support to a controversial theory published a decade ago by Danish astrophysicist Henrik Svensmark, who claimed the climate was highly influenced by galactic cosmic ray (GCR) particles penetrating the earth's atmosphere.

Svensmark's theory, which pitted him against today's mainstream theorists who claim carbon dioxide (CO2) is responsible for global warming, involved a link between the earth's magnetic field and climate, since that field helps regulate the number of GCR particles that reach the earth's atmosphere.

"The only way we can explain the (geomagnetic-climate) connection is through the exact same physical mechanisms that were present in Henrik Svensmark's theory," Knudsen said.

"If changes in the magnetic field, which occur independently of the earth's climate, can be linked to changes in precipitation, then it can only be explained through the magnetic field's blocking of the cosmetic rays," he said.

The two scientists acknowledged that CO2 plays an important role in the changing climate, "but the climate is an incredibly complex system, and it is unlikely we have a full overview over which factors play a part and how important each is in a given circumstance," Riisager told Videnskab.

Share This Article With Planet Earth
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit
YahooMyWebYahooMyWeb GoogleGoogle FacebookFacebook



Related Links
Climate Science News - Modeling, Mitigation Adaptation




Tempur-Pedic Mattress Comparison

Newsletters :: SpaceDaily Express :: SpaceWar Express :: TerraDaily Express :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News
Decline Of Carbon Dioxide-Gobbling Plankton Coincided With Ancient Global Cooling
Cornell NY (SPX) Jan 12, 2009
The evolutionary history of diatoms - abundant oceanic plankton that remove billions of tons of carbon dioxide from the air each year - needs to be rewritten, according to a new Cornell study. The findings suggest that after a sudden rise in species numbers, diatoms abruptly declined about 33 million years ago - trends that coincided with severe global cooling.

.
Get Our Free Newsletters Via Email
  



  • Ice closes German rivers to shipping: authorities
  • One dead, 46 missing in Guinea Bissau capsize: navy
  • Mourning for 19 dead, 23 still missing after Costa Rica quake
  • Can Nature's Leading Indicators Presage Environmental Disaster

  • Sequence Matters In Droughts And Floods
  • The earth's magnetic field impacts climate: Danish study
  • Decline Of Carbon Dioxide-Gobbling Plankton Coincided With Ancient Global Cooling
  • Australian military warns of climate conflict: report

  • Mapping In A One Meter Sea Level Rise
  • DMCii and DynAgra Help Farmers Control Costs And Boost Yields
  • Malaysia uses satellite to fight illegal logging: report
  • India To Launch Own Online Earth Browser Dubbed Bhuvan

  • Analysis: The Gazprom-Ukraine dispute
  • Analysis: Central Asian energy in 2009
  • Analysis: African oil faces challenges
  • New technique 'banks' wind farm energy

  • Structure Mediating Spread Of Antibiotic Resistance Identified
  • Fighting AIDS was bright spot of Bush presidency
  • China urges increased vigilance against bird flu during holiday
  • China steps up checks after bird flu death

  • Removing invasive species on remote island unleashed disaster
  • Researchers First To See Reactive Oxygen Species In Vital Enzyme
  • Antibodies Take Evolutionary Leaps To Fight Microbes
  • Asian, US police meet on tackling wildlife crime

  • Polarized Light Pollution Leads Animals Astray
  • Carbon Rich Soil Could Increase Mercury Levels
  • California Cuts Out The Waste At Landfills
  • 'Red tide' linked to nutrient pollution

  • First Americans Arrived As Two Separate Migrations Says New Genetic Evidence
  • Space-age probe may help save eyesight
  • Stevie Wonder looking for gadgets for the blind
  • How Neanderthal Got Whacked By Modern Humans

  • The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2007 - SpaceDaily.AFP and UPI Wire Stories are copyright Agence France-Presse and United Press International. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by SpaceDaily on any Web page published or hosted by SpaceDaily. Privacy Statement