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24/7 News Coverage
January 17, 2017
FLORA AND FAUNA
How to be winner in the game of evolution



Tucson AZ (SPX) Jan 17, 2017
A new study by University of Arizona biologists helps explain why different groups of animals differ dramatically in their number of species, and how this is related to differences in their body forms and ways of life. For millennia, humans have marveled at the seemingly boundless variety and diversity of animals inhabiting the Earth. So far, biologists have described and catalogued about 1.5 million animal species, a number that many think might be eclipsed by the number of species still awaiting ... read more

TECTONICS
Deep mantle chemistry surprise: Carbon content not uniform
Even though carbon is one of the most-abundant elements on Earth, it is actually very difficult to determine how much of it exists below the surface in Earth's interior. Analysis by Carnegie's Mario ... more
WATER WORLD
Short-lived greenhouse gases cause centuries of sea-level rise
Even if there comes a day when the world completely stops emitting greenhouse gases into the atmosphere, coastal regions and island nations will continue to experience rising sea levels for centurie ... more
WATER WORLD
How China is poised for marine fisheries reform
As global fish stocks continue sinking to alarmingly low levels, a joint study by marine fisheries experts from within and outside of China concluded that the country's most recent fisheries conserv ... more
FROTH AND BUBBLE
Researchers develop environmentally friendly soy air filter
Washington State University researchers have developed a soy-based air filter that can capture toxic chemicals, such as carbon monoxide and formaldehyde, which current air filters can't. The r ... more
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Tempur-Pedic Mattress Comparison & Memory Foam Mattress Review


EARTH OBSERVATION
Sentinel-2B launch preparations off to a flying start
Some of us may be easing ourselves gently into the New Year, but for the team readying Sentinel-2B for liftoff on 7 March it's full steam ahead. On 5 January, the satellite was shipped from ESA's si ... more
EARTH OBSERVATION
China receives imagery from high-resolution remote sensing satellites
China has received images from a pair of 0.5-meter high-resolution remote sensing satellites launched in late December last year, the China Aerospace Science and Technology Corporation (CASC) said W ... more
EARTH OBSERVATION
NASA plans another busy year for earth science fieldwork
NASA scientists are crisscrossing the globe in 2017 - from a Hawaiian volcano to Colorado mountain tops and west Pacific islands - to investigate critical scientific questions about how our planet i ... more
AFRICA NEWS
Uganda military denies Congolese rebels left camp
Uganda's military on Monday denied that armed Congolese rebels sheltering in the country had crossed back into the Democratic Republic of Congo, saying they were still in their camp. ... more
WHITE OUT
Snow traps 1,000 motorists in Tunisia
Heavy snow trapped around 1,000 motorists in northwest Tunisia, with heavy blizzards from Europe sweeping the Mediterranean country, the prime minister's office said Monday. ... more


The global chain that produces your fish

CLIMATE SCIENCE
UK experts warn of Trump climate science clampdown
More than 100 of Britain's top climate scientists on Monday urged Prime Minister Theresa May to press US President-elect Donald Trump to safeguard government-led research on global warming. ... more
SINO DAILY
Hong Kong activists declare 'war' after appeal bid snub
An appeal bid by two anti-China lawmakers against their disqualification from Hong Kong's parliament was rejected Monday, as the activists declared "war" on the authorities. ... more

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Nepal sacks quake reconstruction chief
Nepal on Wednesday sacked the chief of its earthquake reconstruction body, a move seen by critics as politically motivated and likely to further delay rebuilding following the April 2015 disaster. Sushil Gyewali was appointed head of the National Reconstruction Authority (NRA) a year ago after months of political wrangling over who should lead the agency. The NRA is tasked with spending ... more
Memory of lost Cyprus home haunts three generations

Six climbers die of cold climbing Guatemala volcano

Debt traps threaten Nepal quake victims

Researchers use nature's weaving formula to engineer advanced functional materials
For the first time, UNSW biomedical engineers have woven a 'smart' fabric that mimics the sophisticated and complex properties of one nature's ingenious materials, the bone tissue periosteum. Having achieved proof of concept, the researchers are now ready to produce fabric prototypes for a range of advanced functional materials that could transform the medical, safety and transport sectors ... more
Unusual physics phenomenon could improve telecoms, computing

NIST physicists 'squeeze' light to cool microscopic drum below quantum limit

York Space Systems signs Cooperative Research and Development Agreement

Researchers publish first video of ruby seadragons in the wild
A research team led by scientists at the University of California San Diego have published the first live recording of ruby seadragons. Ruby seadragons are the third species of seadragon to be discovered, first described in 2015. The marine animal is part of the Syngnathidae family, which also includes seahorses. Researchers at UCSD's Scripps Institution of Oceanography published ... more
How China is poised for marine fisheries reform

Sparton Corporation, Ultra Electronics to produce sonobuoys

Affordable water in the US: A burgeoning crisis

High-tech mooring will measure beneath Antarctic ice
Earth's oceans have soaked up about a third of the carbon dioxide added to the atmosphere by humans through use of fossil fuels and other activities. That's good news for those concerned with greenhouse warming, but bad news for the marine life that's sensitive to the increasing acidity extra CO2 brings to ocean waters. Dr. Elizabeth Shadwick, an assistant professor at William and Mary's V ... more
Climate change shows in shrinking Antarctic snows

Ice cracks force shutdown of UK Antarctic station

Arctic shrews, parasites indicate climate change effect on ecosystems

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Europe urged to expand pesticide ban for bees' sake
Europe should expand a ban on bee-harming pesticides, environmental lobby group Greenpeace said Thursday, as it released a report warning of widespread risks to agriculture and the environment. The report by biologists at the University of Sussex, commissioned by Greenpeace, concluded that the threat posed to bees by neonicotinoid pesticides was greater than perceived in 2013 when the Europe ... more
Pressures from grazers hastens ecosystem collapse from drought

Grasslands hold potential for increased food production

Russia's Vavilov institute, guardian of world's lost plants

Modeling magma to find copper
Copper is an essential element of our society with main uses in the field of electricity and electronics. About 70% of the copper comes from deposits formed several million years ago during events of magma degassing within the Earth's crust just above subduction zones. Despite similar ore forming processes, the size of these deposits can vary orders of magnitude from one place to another, ... more
Villagers evacuated as Britain faces severe flood warnings

New magma modeling aids search for copper

Rain slackens across Thailand's flood-hit south

Uganda military denies Congolese rebels left camp
Uganda's military on Monday denied that armed Congolese rebels sheltering in the country had crossed back into the Democratic Republic of Congo, saying they were still in their camp. The DRC government said Sunday that at least 200 former members of M23, a mostly ethnic Tutsi rebel group defeated by the Congolese army three years ago, arrived from Uganda and took over a village in North Kivu ... more
Ivory Coast government and rebel troops reach deal

Congolese M23 rebels cross over from Uganda, 'clash with army'

Gambian crisis takes centre stage at Mali summit

Baboons produce vocalizations comparable to vowels
Baboons produce vocalizations comparable to vowels. This is what has been demonstrated by an international team coordinated by researchers from the Gipsa-Lab (CNRS/Grenoble INP/Grenoble Alpes University), the Laboratory of Cognitive Psychology (CNRS/AMU), and the Laboratory of Anatomy at the University of Montpellier, using acoustic analyses of vocalizations coupled with an anatomical study of t ... more
Research sheds new light on high-altitude settlement in Tibet

A research framework for tracing human migration events after 'out of Africa' origins

Hair today, hungover tomorrow as young Japanese come of age

Military Radar Summit 2017
UK experts warn of Trump climate science clampdown
More than 100 of Britain's top climate scientists on Monday urged Prime Minister Theresa May to press US President-elect Donald Trump to safeguard government-led research on global warming. "We stand ready to support and assist our counterparts in the United States... in resisting any political attempts to prevent, hamper or interfere with vital research on climate change," they wrote in an ... more
On climate, top diplomat nominee says US must stay engaged

Obama again defends climate deal

Global warming hiatus disproved yet again

Study tracks 'memory' of soil moisture
The top 2 inches of topsoil on all of Earth's landmasses contains an infinitesimal fraction of the planet's water - less than one-thousandth of a percent. Yet because of its position at the interface between the land and the atmosphere, that tiny amount plays a crucial role in everything from agriculture to weather and climate, and even the spread of disease. The behavior and dynamics of t ... more
SAGE III to Provide Highly Accurate Measurements of Atmospheric Gases

exactEarth reports initial launch for its second generation real-time constellation

Sentinel-2B launch preparations off to a flying start

ISIS OBC Bundle Deal
Paleontologists classify mysterious ancient cone-shaped sea creatures
One branch on the tree of life is a bit more crowded today. A team of scientists led by 20-year-old University of Toronto (U of T) undergraduate student Joseph Moysiuk has finally determined what a bizarre group of extinct cone-shaped animals actually are. Known as hyoliths, these marine creatures evolved over 530 million years ago during the Cambrian period and are among the first animals ... more
Proto India was by not as isolated as we thought

280 million-year-old fossil reveals origins of chimaeroid fishes

How long did it take to hatch a dinosaur egg

Australian energy group backs Li Ka-shing takeover
Li Ka-shing's Cheung Kong Infrastructure on Monday moved a step closer to a more than Aus$7 billion (US$5.2 billion) takeover of Australian energy group Duet after a recommendation from the energy group's board. In December, the Hong Kong billionaire put in an unsolicited and conditional offer of $Aus3 per share for Duet. Following a review of the offer, the Duet board said it had agreed ... more
China to build $1.5 billion power line across Pakistan

MIT Energy Initiative report provides guidance for evolving electric power sector

Toward energy solutions for northern regions

Develop commercial strategies for the global deployment of SMRs and Advanced Reactors
Self-assembling particles brighten future of LED lighting
Just when lighting aficionados were in a dark place, LEDs came to the rescue. Over the past decade, LED technologies - short for light-emitting diode - have swept the lighting industry by offering features such as durability, efficiency and long life. Now, Princeton engineering researchers have illuminated another path forward for LED technologies by refining the manufacturing of light sou ... more
Nanoscale view of energy storage

UK-Led Hydrogen Fuel Project Promises to Provide Ultra-Clean Air in China

Scientists discover a molecular motor has a 'gear' for directional switching

How to be winner in the game of evolution
A new study by University of Arizona biologists helps explain why different groups of animals differ dramatically in their number of species, and how this is related to differences in their body forms and ways of life. For millennia, humans have marveled at the seemingly boundless variety and diversity of animals inhabiting the Earth. So far, biologists have described and catalogued about ... more
Researchers quantify viper strike with high-speed video

Amphibians don't lose memories during hibernation

Hundreds protest against elephant trade in Tanzania

Hong Kong leadership hopeful pledges to heal city's 'heartache'
Hong Kong's tough former deputy leader Carrie Lam, widely seen as China's favourite in an upcoming election for the top post, pledged Monday to end the divided city's "heartache" as she announced her candidacy. Lam was deputy to the unpopular current chief executive Leung Chun-ying until she resigned to contest the poll, but is a less disliked figure. Leung is vilified by the city's pro ... more
Hong Kong activists declare 'war' after appeal bid snub

Lessons in respect at China's Confucius kindergartens

Taiwan says gang links in protest against HK activists

Why are Australia's shrublands like 'knee-high tropical rainforests'?
Some of the Earth's ecosystems host a disproportionately high number of plant species, and infertile shrublands in warm semi-arid regions support 20 per cent of the world's plant species on five percent of the land surface. In particular, some shrublands in South-Western Australia are so species-rich that some botanists refer to them as "knee-high tropical rainforests." How a large number ... more
Microbes rule in 'knee-high tropical rainforests'

Philippine minister says Dora can't explore pristine Palawan

Study: Trees with thicker bark are more resistant to fire



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